Pat M. Armstrong

Last night I knelt where Hiram knelt
and took an obligation
today I’m closer to my God
and I’m a Master Mason

Tho’ heretofore my fellow men
seemed each one like the other
today I search each one apart
I’m looking for my brother

And as I feel his friendly grip
it fills my heart with pride
I know that while I’m on the square
that he is by my side

His footsteps on my errand go
if I should such require:
His prayers will lead in my behalf
if I should so desire

My words are safe within his breast
as though within my own
his hand forever at my back
to help me safely home

Good counsel whispers in my ear
and warns of any danger
By square and compass, Brother now!
Who once would call me stranger

I might have lived a moral life
and risen to distinction
Without my Brothers helping hand
and fellowship of Masons

But God, who knows how hard it is
to resist life’s temptations
knows why I knelt where Hiram knelt
and took that obligation.

*

Author Unkown

I will do more than belong –– I will participate.
I will do more than care –– I will help.
I will do more than believe –– I will practice.
I will do more than be fair –– I will be kind.
I will do more than forgive –– I will forget.
I will do more than dream –– I will work.
I will do more than teach –– I will inspire.
I will do more than earn –– I will enrich.
I will do more than give –– I will serve.
I will do more than live –– I will grow.
I will do more then be friendly –– I will be a friend.
I will do more than be a citizen –– I will be a patriot.

*

Author Unknown

Ten Master Masons, happy, doing fine;
One listened to a rumor, then there were nine.

Nine Master Masons, faithful, never late;
One didn’t like the “Master,” then there were eight.

Eight Master Masons, on their way to heaven;
One joined too many clubs, then there were seven.

Seven Master Masons, life dealt some hard licks;
One grew discouraged, then there were six.

Six Master Masons, all very much alive;
One lost his interest, then there were five.

Five Master Masons, wishing there were more;
Got into a great dispute, then there were four.

Four Master Masons, busy as could be;
One didn’t like the programs, then there were three.

Three Master Masons, was one of them you?
One grew tired of all the work, then there were two.

Two Master Masons with so much to be done;
One said “What’s the use,” then there was one.

One Master Mason, found a brother — true!
Brought him to the Lodge, then there were two.

Two Master Masons didn’t find work a bore;
Each brought another, then there were four.

Four Master Masons saved their Lodges fate;
By showing others kindness, then there were eight.

Eight Master Masons, loving their Lodges bright sheen;
Talked so much about it, they soon counted sixteen.

Sixteen Master Masons, to their obligations true;
Were pleased when their number went to thirty-two.

So we can’t put our troubles at the Lodges door;
It’s our fault for harming the Lodge we adore.

Don’t fuss about the programs or the “Master” in the East;
Keep your obligation by serving even the very least.

*

By Robert Morris

A city set upon a hill
Cannot be hid;
Exposed to every eye, it will
Over surrounding plain and vale,
An influence shed,
And spread the light of peace afar,
Or blight the land with horrid war.

Each Mason’s Lodge is planted so
For high display;
Each is a BEACON LIGHT, to show
Life’s weary wanderers as they go,
The better way;
To show by ties of earthly love,
How perfect is the Lodge above!

Be this your willing task, dear friends,
While laboring here;
Borrow from Him who kindly lends
The heavenly ladder that ascends
The higher sphere;
And let the world your progress see,
Upward by FAITH, HOPE, CHARITY.        

*

By Unknown

The house is full of arcana, and mystery profound;
We do not dare to run about or make the slightest sound.

We leave the big piano shut and do not strike a note;
the doctor’s been here seven times since father rode the goat.

He joined the lodge a week ago; Got in at 4:00 a.m. —-
And sixteen brethren brought him home, though he says that he brought them.

His wrist was sprained and one big rip had rent his Sunday coat —-
There must have been a lively time when father rode the goat.

He’s resting on the couch today! And practicing his signs —-
The hailing signal, the working grip, and other monkeyshines;

He mutters passwords ‘neath his breath, And other things he’ll quote —-
They surely had an evening’s work when father rode the goat.

He has a gorgeous uniform, all gold and red and blue —-
A hat with plumes and yellow braid, And golden badges too.

But, somehow, when we mention it, he wears a look so grim;
we wonder if he rode the goat —- or if the goat rode him!

*

Fourteen american presidents were freemasons. Many people believe there have been more including George H W Bush, George W Bush, Bill Clinton, and our current President  Barrack Obama.  These men are not Freemasons. The fourteen American Presidents who have been verified as Free and Accepted Masons are as follows: 

George Washington
James Monroe
Andrew Jackson
James Polk
James Buchanan
Andrew Johnson
James Garfield
William McKinley
Theodore Roosevelt
Howard Taft
Warren Harding
Franklin Roosevelt
Harry Truman
Gerald Ford

By Robert Morris

Brother, let us often ponder
What we Masons pledged to do,
When, prepared at yonder’s altar,
We assumed the Mason’s vow;
Foot and knee, breast, hand and cheek,
Let these oft our duties speak.

Breast to breast: in holy casket
At life’s center strongly held,
Every sacred thing intrusted,
Sealed by faith’s unbroken seal;
What you promised God to shield
Suffer, die, but never yield.

Never yield whate’er the trial;
Never yield whate’er the number;
Never yield through foully threatened,
Even at the stroke of death.
Hand to back: A brother falling —
His misfortune is too great,
Stretch the generous hand, sustain him,
Quick, before it is too late.

Like a strong, unfaltering prop,
Hold the faltering brother up.
Hold him up; stand like a column;
Hold him up: there’s good stuff in him;
Hold him with his head toward Heaven;
Hold him with the lion’s grip.

Cheek to cheek: O, when the tempter
Comes, a brother’s soul to win,
With a timely whisper warn him
Of the dark and deadly sin.
Extricate him from the snare,
Save him with fraternal care.

Save him — Heavenly powers invoke you —
Save him — man is worth the saving
Save him — breathe your spirit in him
As you’d have your God save you.

This completes the obligation;
Brother, lest you let it slip,
Fasten on tenacious memory
All our points of Fellowship;
Foot and knee, breast, hand, and cheek —
Foot and knee, breast, hand, and cheek.

*